Current Courses

Graphical Version

Current Courses

Spring 2018

CORE COURSES

Note: All McBride sophomores must take the following two required classes.  Each course will be offered twice, in the fall and spring.  Students will receive an email instructing them as to which class they should register for in the fall.

HNRS305: Explorations in Modern America (K. Osgood)

Course Theme: “Controversies and Challenges, Past and Present” 

Humans are accustomed to thinking about life as a journey, one full of unexpected twists, steep hills, confounding crossroads, and occasional dead ends. The choice of which road to take is puzzling: how do we figure out where we are, where we want to go, and why? What happens when we’re forced into a scenario that wasn’t of our design or choosing? Furthermore, how do we fit these pieces of life together into a coherent narrative about ourselves? Some of the oldest and most common stories are those of individuals trying to work through this maze of life. By reading novels, watching films, and writing narratives, we will explore human movement—through space and through life—and use the metaphor of the puzzle to understand what compels our personal paths and the stories that we tell about them that are common to all people regardless of place, time, or culture.

Schedule Listing: HNRS305, Explorations in Modern America
Registration Number: 12650
Class Meetings: Wednesdays, 6:00-9:00 PM 
Instructor: Kenneth Osgood

HNRS315: Explorations in the Modern World (Brandt)

Course Theme:  Narrative and the Puzzle of the Human Journey 

Humans are accustomed to thinking about life as a journey, one that encompasses many smaller pathways of experience. Yet often the choice of which road to take is puzzling: how do we figure out where we are, where we want to go, and why? What happens when we’re forced into a scenario that wasn’t of our design or choosing? Some of the oldest and most common stories are those of individuals trying to work through this maze of life. By reading novels and writing personal narratives, we will explore human movement—through space and through life—and use the metaphor of the puzzle to understand what compels our personal paths and the decisions we make about them that are common to all people regardless of place, time, or culture. 

Schedule Listing: HNRS315, Explorations in the Modern World
Registration Number: 12651
Class Meetings: Wednesdays, 6:00-9:00 PM
Instructor: Melanie Brandt

UPPER LEVEL ELECTIVES

Note: McBride juniors and seniors may enroll in any one of the following courses. Note that the CSM online course schedule identifies these courses by their generic titles (e.g. “Explorations in Earth, Energy, & the Environment) but each course has a specific theme listed and described below (e.g. "Communicating Across Cultures"). Occasionally, some courses may have the same time title, but will address different themes. Be sure to register for the appropriate section; double-check the instructor name(s) and registration numbers. 

HNRS 435:  Explorations in Culture, Society and Creative Arts (Vu)

Course Theme:  "Vietnam:  War, Food or Growth"

This course will examine the cultural, economic and historical views of Vietnam. Vietnam is one of the oldest civilizations in Asia, however American's fascinate and related discussions are mainly around the Vietnam war, which only spans 2 decades. This course will be discuss how the war is weaved in the larger text of the culture, politics and history of Vietnam and geopolitical circumstances of that era. As one of the fasting developing country in the world, Vietnam stands on the nexus of manufacturing and technology to maintain the growth of the region. Students will have a familiarity with the Vietnamese language, which is considered one of the hardest language to learn for native English speakers. There will optional trips to local markets, restaurants and Vietnamese American celebrations to round out the senses on the Vietnamese culture, music, food and holidays.

Schedule Listing:  HNRS435:  Explorations in Culture, Society and Creative Arts
Registration Number:  12653
Class Meetings:  Mondays, 6:00-9:00pm
Instructors:  Khahn Vu and Bob Klimek

HNRS 445: Explorations in Science, Technology, and Society (Snieder)

Course Theme: "Science and Spirituality"

The Mines education focuses on the development and application of science and engineering, but leaves little space for the big spiritual questions that arise in most of us. In this class we will explore the interface of science and spirituality, and we will study questions such as the following. How did how our worldview change in history? Is the universe a mindless machine? What does quantum mechanics teach us about this? What is the connection between mind and matter? (Does mind matter? Does matter mind?) Why can humans be devils or saints? What are the roles of rational thinking and intuition? This class is a true exploration in the sense that most questions above cannot be tackled as a science or engineering problem; instead we will dive deeper by exploring together.

The class is by far one of my top favorite classes at Mines, and it is and will be a blessing to each student who takes it. I felt an aura of respect in the room for the entire class.
(From a student who took the class in the spring of 2017.)

Schedule Listing: HNRS445A: Explorations in Science, Technology, and Society
Registration Number: 12654
Class Meetings: Wednesdays, 6:00-9:00 PM
Instructor: Roel Snieder

HNRS 450: Explorations of Earth, Energy, and Environment (Leydens)

Course Theme: "Decision-Making and Communicating Uncertainty and Risk"

How does climate change pose new or increasing risks to humans and the environment? How safe is it to walk, run, or bike when ground-level ozone exceeds EPA standards? In those and many other risk-related contexts, how do individuals define risk? Who establishes acceptable levels of risk? Who defines risk for us? Who benefits and who does not benefit from such definitions?

This course explores multiple perspectives on an overarching question: How do people perceive risk, as well as make decisions and communicate under conditions of uncertainty and risk? Although risk perception, risk management, and risk communication are three major course components, they are not treated separately but in terms of how they interrelate. How we perceive risk shapes how we manage and communicate it—and sometimes, vice versa. Case studies include engineers and applied scientists coping with complex forms of uncertainty and risk, communicating in organizational and public sphere contexts with multiple audiences—via the press and directly to the public, stockholders, co-workers, local communities, and more. Take the risk, and join us.

Schedule Listing: HNRS450: Explorations of Earth, Energy, and Environment
Registration Number: 12656
Class Meetings: Thursdays, 2:00-5:00 PM
Instructor: Jon A. Leydens

HNRS 476A:  Community Engagement Through Service Learning 

Service Learning Through Community Engagement is an immersion service learning experience, working directly with an underserved population. The academic content explores themes of poverty and privilege with first-person narrative, academic analysis, lecture and film, Ask Big Questions discussions, and student presentations. We focus on the systemic issues that lead to poverty and privilege in their various forms within our local community, the Denver metro area, and in CO and the US more broadly.

We meet for class approximately 2 hours per week (sometimes meeting both days; other weeks just once) and you volunteer 3-4 hours per week with your chosen organization. All volunteer projects must be set up before the beginning of the spring semester. Some, like the National Sports Center for the Disabled ski program at Winter Park (visit www.nscd.org for more information), Mt. Saint Vincent Home for abused/abandoned children, Lookout Mountain Youth Services Center for incarcerated boys, or Betty Marler Youth Services Center for incarcerated girls, require training and/or background checks that need to be started as early as the beginning of November.

Please contact Ed Cecil in Timberline 2 Room 17 on West Campus Dr., fcecil@mines.edu, 303-273-3736 for more information and a list of possible projects and contacts.

The course is team-taught by Cortney Holles in LAIS, Ed Cecil from Physics, and Meridee Cecil, geologist and potter.

You will need to contact the instructor to register for this class.

Schedule Listing:  HNRS476A
Registration Number: 11779
Class Meetings:  Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:00-3:15 PM
Instructors: Cortney Holles (P), Edward Cecil, Meridee Cecil

HNRS 405:  McBride Practicum

The McBride Practicum requirement is an experiential learning program that is explained in detail on the Practicum page of the McBride website.  Typically this course is taken in conjunction with another 400-level McBride seminar.  Although this course runs much like an “independent study” there will be several recurring meetings over the course of the semester, at times set to work with students’ schedules.  The time listed below is a “place holder” time.  

Schedule Listing: HNRS 405A: McBride Practicum
Registration Number: TBA
Class Meetings: Thursdays, 6:00-9:00 PM
Instructor: Rachel Osgood


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